Friday, March 30, 2012

The No-Cutting Bubble Romper

For my latest project, I was able to use a fabric I had exactly 1/2 yard of -- and to use the whole piece, with no cutting, no scraps, and only one seam -- to make a bubble romper for spring.  I combined a couple of tutorials I found online to do it.

I used the Craftiness is Not Optional Ice Cream Social Dress tutorial to make the top and Mama Says Sew's bubble romper tutorial to ... romperify ... the bottom.


One seam at the selvages to make a tube.
Folded over the top .25 inch, then 2.25 inches and pressed.
Stitched down at the edge of the fold (leaving a couple inches open), and again a little more than an inch up, to make an elastic casing with a frill above.
Turned the bottom under .25 inch, then about another 1/3 inch, and pressed.
Used a little coordinating scrap (left over from this project) to make two, 2"x4.5" strips.


Sewed into tubes, then turned inside out and tucked the ends in, and stitched down the ends.
Pinned crotch pieces in place at the center of front and back.  I did this wrong the first time -- one should be on the inside of the garment and one should be on the outside.
Stitched around bottom of dress, leaving enough room for a 1/8 inch elastic, and leaving openings at the edges of the pink strips for the elastic to go in.

Added a 1" length of elastic the measurement of the baby's chest in the top casing, and added two 1/8" lengths of elastic, each one the measurement around one of the baby's thighs, one into each of the leg casings.





Sewed elastic casing closed and pinned down ribbon straps.  It took me a few tries to get the length right.





Got to this point and realized I didn't have enough regular snaps -- the kind you punch in with the little tool -- so I had to use sew-in snaps.  My sew-in snaps were bigger, though, which made stitching around the snap plackets pretty tricky!
 Last but not least, I made a bow out of the rest of my ribbon (which I have been saving ever since it came as wrapping on a baby shower gift -- isn't it pretty?!) and hand-sewed it on.
Finished product.

I hadn't really been thinking of Easter when I bought the fabric -- just sort of spring/summer -- but now I'm thinking it will be perfect for the church Easter egg hunt on Saturday!

The coolest part? It used $5 worth of fabric, ribbon I was given, and maybe a couple bucks' worth of notions, etc., tops.  

Friday, March 23, 2012

Glam sunsuit

I had a 1/2 yard of this cool Robert Kaufman geometric print fabric and some metallic gold bias tape I'd been hanging onto for a rainy day, and one day it came to me that they were MFEO.

I used Little Betty Designs' sunsuit tutorial and MADE's bloomers pattern and adapted it just a tiny bit so that I could use the bias tape for the elastic casings at the top and the legs.


As I was working on it, I was afraid the gold might make it a little "richest little divorcee in Palm Springs," but I don't think those fears were realized.    



It's definitely glam, but it's still "baby glam," I think.  The coolest thing is that it cost $10 to make, accounting for thread, snaps, the whole nine yards.  



And it has the added benefit of highlighting the cutest little thigh rolls evah.

This one is just because... omg, y'all.  Really.


Saturday, March 17, 2012

Reversible jumper and sundress top -- and the cabled blanket is finally DONE!

Like so many other people, I instantly fell for Michael Miller's Sarah Jane Children at Play fabric when it came out and had been hanging onto a couple of contrasting yards for months until I could work up the nerve to cut it out. I had also been eyeballing Sandra Lister's reversible jumper pattern for quite some time with these fabrics in mind, so when I finally managed to master buttonholes a week or so ago, I decided it was time to bite the bullet.

When I started to cut it out, I was horrified to realize that I didn't have quiiiite enough fabric. Like, by an inch. The fabric is an odd width (42 in or so instead of the 44-45 I'm used to) and the doll fabric is directional, so it has to be cut out a certain way. I fiddled and fiddled with it and finally discovered that if I held my breath and made the fabric scream, I could just barely -- we're talking about a millimeter -- get what I needed.

And here's the final product. It was relatively easy to put together, although hemming both sides at once was a little tricky.  But I'm pretty happy with the result.




The odd part was, because of the shape of the pieces, I then had several fairly nice-sized chunks left over. I was determined to get something else out of it. After much contemplation, I settled on the "Pretty. Easy. Sundress." from Craftiness is not Optional. Except I would make it a top, because H already has too many dresses, but can use some more casual clothes for the warmer months (which are pretty much upon us and will be here through October).

I must admit, I had a tiny bit of trouble understanding the instructions for making the pattern. (I have a BFA in theater with an English minor and a MA in journalism. I am not a mathy sort of person.) So mine ended up a little bit too big.  Better than too small, I guess!  I also added a little line of rickrack along the top to make it a bit vintagier. What?  That's a word.

I wasn't thrilled with the way the inside looked where the two big pieces are joined, so I think next time I will make the bodice pieces 3/4 of an inch longer so I can fold it under and insert the skirt into the lined bodice so there are no ugly edge pieces on the inside.







I will also make it about an inch or so longer, because there was a fair amount of belly and top-of-diaper flashing going on.




I will make it again, though... it's perfect for summer -- cool and casual but way cuter than a onesie!

And I even have a few precious scraps of my fabric left for some teeny project down the line!

And this week I finished a project I have been working on for nearly a year and a half! H's baby blanket. I started it three months before she was born. I hadn't planned on making her one, but after I made one for a little friend, I decided she needed one, too.  Only with a young baby it is not exactly easy to find time to sit around knitting! 

 I used this pattern.  It isn't hard at all (in fact, it would be a good first cabling project), just time-consuming!  I actually took out a couple of cables and made it a small "stroller blanket" size, because otherwise it would never have been finished.  So, she's over a year old and just now getting her baby blanket!

with a pencil for scale ;)
The funny thing is, she was lying on this blanket in the pictures I took when she was a few days old and used on her birth announcement.  But it wasn't close to finished.  The blanket ended on needles right out of the frame! Ah, well, it's finally done now. And the first thing I did after finishing it was wash it to get the dusty smell out.  Better late than never!

Saturday, March 10, 2012

Tutorial: Easy Pieced Toddler Skirt out of Two Fat Quarters


I've spent the last eight months or so re-learning to sew by following others' patterns and tutorials, and I'd been kind of wanting to try my own but didn't think I knew enough to come up with anything new. Well, I'm not going to say this is new -- it's not like I'm reinventing the wheel; there are loads of toddler skirt tutorials, even ones using fat quarters -- but I've never seen one exactly like this and it is the first thing I've ever really concocted on my own, sewing-wise, so I'm excited to share it.


The inspiration was this adorable skirt I bought H (on sale, of course). I love the crazy fullness. (I think the style is called dirndl, but I could be wrong.) It looks so cute on her, especially the way it sort of poofs out over her little bottom! The more I looked at it, the more I thought, I could do that! But I wanted to try with vertical instead of horizontal piecing.

For some reason, I got the notion to see if I could make it out of these two coordinating fat quarters I bought ages ago. If you aren't familiar, a fat quarter is a quarter-yard of fabric, but cut "fat" instead of long. I think it started out as a quilting thing, although there are lots of projects you can find using fat quarters. They're usually 18"x22". You can get them precut at Joann's for about $2.50, but I bought these on sale, so paid about half that. The Joann's precuts aren't quite highest quality, though. You can get the good stuff like designer quilting cotton and Japanese imports for about the same price (plus a usually quite small shipping fee) on Etsy. Designer-style, one-of-a-kind skirt for $5 and a bit more than an hour of your time? What's not to like?

I made this to fit a smallish 13-month-old, but it's easily adjustable to fit a smaller baby or quite-a-bit-larger child. You just need to know your child's waist measurement and how long you want it to be. I'll also show you how to add a ribbon belt, if you like. Okay, here's how you do it:


1. Prewash and iron your coordinating fat quarters. You may also want to square them up. I probably should have, as mine were obviously cut from the bolt quite wonky, but I didn't. The fullness of the skirt covers a multitude of sins.

Here's how you cut it.




2. Take Fabric A and neatly fold it in half lengthwise, then again widthwise. Press, creasing sharply, then unfold and cut along the creases. (All these cuts work whether your fabric is directional, napped, or neither--yay!)

3. Fold Fabric B in half lengthwise and press and cut in half. Set one half aside for just a moment. Take the other half and fold, press, and cut it in half again lengthwise, giving you two 22"x4.5" strips. These will eventually become your waistband. Set them aside for now. Go back to the other half of your Fabric B fat quarter. Fold it in half widthwise, then fold it in half widthwise again. Press and cut along the creases; this will give you four 5.5"x9 pieces.

3. You're going to make one long strip of fabric -- the main part of your skirt-- by alternating your Fabric A and Fabric B pieces. This is the most tedious part of the skirt, but even so, it only took me about 20 minutes, and I was doing French seams and ironing between each step. You can join these pieces a variety of ways, including serging if you're lucky enough to have a serger, or regular stitching (followed by pinking or zigzagging the edges. You don't want to leave them raw in this project). I'll show you French seams, because that's what I did. If you want to give your skirt even more fullness, you can use one of the other methods and a narrow seam allowance.

 4. Put two of your pieces together with WRONG sides together. If you haven't done French seams before, this will look and feel really backward to you. Stitch with 1/4 inch seam allowance. I just use the side of my presser foot as my guide. Flip the fabric over and press your seam over the other way neatly. Now with right sides together, stitch, leaving 1/2" allowance. Now your raw edge is enclosed.


5. Repeat this process, alternating between Fabric A and Fabric B, until you have a long strip with eight individual pieces. (The first step of the French seam will look REALLY wrong when it's joined to a piece with the seam already finished, by the way.)
  
Case in point.

  
6. Do one last French seam to join the ends of the strip, making a loop.

7. Sew a basting stitch 1/4 or 1/3 inch from the top and gather. If you don't know how to do this, google "basting stitch gather," and you'll find lots of tutorials. It's super easy. Don't gather it as much as I did, or you'll have to loosen it up a lot. It should be about 1.5 times the waist measurement.

8. Set your main skirt piece aside for now.  Join your two waistband pieces into one long strip. Again, I used a French seam. Then cut this to about 1.5 times the wearer's waist measurement. The scrap you cut away is the only bit of fabric you won't use of your fat quarters (and there is actually a way you can use that up as well -- to come).



9. Fold the waistband strip in half lengthwise and press a crease into it. Then turn one long edge under 1/2 inch and press. I use this awesome folding guide I got as a free download at the Scientific Seamstress blog. Turn the other edge under 3/4 inch and press. You've just made what sort of resembles a double-fold bias tape, except that it isn't cut on the bias. Fold each short end under 1/2 inch and crease.




10. Now we're going to cut four belt loops. I used metallic gold ribbon for a little bling, but you could also use that little fabric scrap you cut off to make four skinny tubes. Cut them about the same length as the waistband is wide (4.5") and pin three of them at even intervals on the right side of your waistband strip, as shown. The fourth will cover the waistband ends, so space them accordingly. Stitch them down at each end.


11. Grab your main skirt piece again. At one of your seams (any one, since there's no front or back at this point), start attaching your waistband like this: With your skirt wrong side out, put your waistband wrong side out with the narrower folded edge positioned at or just ever so slightly below the gathered edge of the skirt. This is hard to explain, so see the photo! Pin.












 11. Adjust your gather so it is the length  of your waistband (with ends folded under) minus half an inch. Pin your waistband to your skirt all the way around, keeping the gather as even as you can. The two folded ends of your waistband strip should overlap. I really tried to show this in the picture, but it's very hard to tell with the fabric I used.
  
12. Stitch all the way around your skirt, as close to the uppermost casing fold as you can.
Here's what you've got after stitching your waistband "tape" on.


13. Turn skirt right-side out and bring your waistband "tape" over so that it encloses the raw top of your skirt and makes a casing for your elastic.  Just like with bias tape, the other fold you made in the waistband should be folded under so there are no raw edges exposed. When you stitch in a moment, you will be closing the waistband and enclosing the gathered edge of your skirt.


At the point where the two ends of your casing meet, slip the end of your fourth belt loop under the casing (just on the outside of the skirt -- the other side will remain loose for now). 

 
Topstitch down as close to the edge of the casing as you can.



14. Cut a piece of 1" elastic 1" longer than the waist measurement you are using. My daughter has a 19" waist, so I cut 20". Using a large safety pin, feed it through your waistband.


When it's all the way through, overlap the elastic 1" and sew to secure.



15. Now sew a seam perpendicular to the casing seam you just sewed (vertical as the skirt is worn) right across the folded-over ends of your casing, which will close your casing and secure your elastic.




16. Fold the bottom edge of your skirt under 1/2 inch and press.



17. Determine how long you want your skirt; fold over as much as desired, press, and hem. I folded it under another half-inch. I hemmed twice, just because I like the way it looks.


If your child is taller, you can save yourself  an inch here by using bias tape instead of hemming.

Here's the inside now.  Look at all those seams!  Aren't you glad you enclosed them all so they're not an unsightly mess?



18. With a needle and thread, sew your last belt loop in place. It is hard to take a picture of yourself sewing with a needle and thread unless you have a third arm, so this looks ridiculous.




19. The part of the skirt with the wider space between the belt loops is the front. Your bow goes here! Cut a nice, wide piece of ribbon to your desired length for your belt. String it and use fray-check or heat sealing to finish the edges. A matching fabric sash would be even cuter if you have one more fat quarter!

 20. Do a Snoopy dance! You did it!




It looks pretty darn cute on my little one, if I say so myself. Cuter in person. I had a very tough time getting a picture of it on because she was in a whirling dervish mood today. I'll update this if I ever get a better shot of it. Imagine how much cuter it would be with some fantastic Amy Butler or Michael Miller fabric!  I'll have to give it a try sometime.



This is my first tutorial, so I hope it makes sense! If I've left anything out, please let me know!

Friday, March 30, 2012

The No-Cutting Bubble Romper

For my latest project, I was able to use a fabric I had exactly 1/2 yard of -- and to use the whole piece, with no cutting, no scraps, and only one seam -- to make a bubble romper for spring.  I combined a couple of tutorials I found online to do it.

I used the Craftiness is Not Optional Ice Cream Social Dress tutorial to make the top and Mama Says Sew's bubble romper tutorial to ... romperify ... the bottom.


One seam at the selvages to make a tube.
Folded over the top .25 inch, then 2.25 inches and pressed.
Stitched down at the edge of the fold (leaving a couple inches open), and again a little more than an inch up, to make an elastic casing with a frill above.
Turned the bottom under .25 inch, then about another 1/3 inch, and pressed.
Used a little coordinating scrap (left over from this project) to make two, 2"x4.5" strips.


Sewed into tubes, then turned inside out and tucked the ends in, and stitched down the ends.
Pinned crotch pieces in place at the center of front and back.  I did this wrong the first time -- one should be on the inside of the garment and one should be on the outside.
Stitched around bottom of dress, leaving enough room for a 1/8 inch elastic, and leaving openings at the edges of the pink strips for the elastic to go in.

Added a 1" length of elastic the measurement of the baby's chest in the top casing, and added two 1/8" lengths of elastic, each one the measurement around one of the baby's thighs, one into each of the leg casings.





Sewed elastic casing closed and pinned down ribbon straps.  It took me a few tries to get the length right.





Got to this point and realized I didn't have enough regular snaps -- the kind you punch in with the little tool -- so I had to use sew-in snaps.  My sew-in snaps were bigger, though, which made stitching around the snap plackets pretty tricky!
 Last but not least, I made a bow out of the rest of my ribbon (which I have been saving ever since it came as wrapping on a baby shower gift -- isn't it pretty?!) and hand-sewed it on.
Finished product.

I hadn't really been thinking of Easter when I bought the fabric -- just sort of spring/summer -- but now I'm thinking it will be perfect for the church Easter egg hunt on Saturday!

The coolest part? It used $5 worth of fabric, ribbon I was given, and maybe a couple bucks' worth of notions, etc., tops.  

Friday, March 23, 2012

Glam sunsuit

I had a 1/2 yard of this cool Robert Kaufman geometric print fabric and some metallic gold bias tape I'd been hanging onto for a rainy day, and one day it came to me that they were MFEO.

I used Little Betty Designs' sunsuit tutorial and MADE's bloomers pattern and adapted it just a tiny bit so that I could use the bias tape for the elastic casings at the top and the legs.


As I was working on it, I was afraid the gold might make it a little "richest little divorcee in Palm Springs," but I don't think those fears were realized.    



It's definitely glam, but it's still "baby glam," I think.  The coolest thing is that it cost $10 to make, accounting for thread, snaps, the whole nine yards.  



And it has the added benefit of highlighting the cutest little thigh rolls evah.

This one is just because... omg, y'all.  Really.


Saturday, March 17, 2012

Reversible jumper and sundress top -- and the cabled blanket is finally DONE!

Like so many other people, I instantly fell for Michael Miller's Sarah Jane Children at Play fabric when it came out and had been hanging onto a couple of contrasting yards for months until I could work up the nerve to cut it out. I had also been eyeballing Sandra Lister's reversible jumper pattern for quite some time with these fabrics in mind, so when I finally managed to master buttonholes a week or so ago, I decided it was time to bite the bullet.

When I started to cut it out, I was horrified to realize that I didn't have quiiiite enough fabric. Like, by an inch. The fabric is an odd width (42 in or so instead of the 44-45 I'm used to) and the doll fabric is directional, so it has to be cut out a certain way. I fiddled and fiddled with it and finally discovered that if I held my breath and made the fabric scream, I could just barely -- we're talking about a millimeter -- get what I needed.

And here's the final product. It was relatively easy to put together, although hemming both sides at once was a little tricky.  But I'm pretty happy with the result.




The odd part was, because of the shape of the pieces, I then had several fairly nice-sized chunks left over. I was determined to get something else out of it. After much contemplation, I settled on the "Pretty. Easy. Sundress." from Craftiness is not Optional. Except I would make it a top, because H already has too many dresses, but can use some more casual clothes for the warmer months (which are pretty much upon us and will be here through October).

I must admit, I had a tiny bit of trouble understanding the instructions for making the pattern. (I have a BFA in theater with an English minor and a MA in journalism. I am not a mathy sort of person.) So mine ended up a little bit too big.  Better than too small, I guess!  I also added a little line of rickrack along the top to make it a bit vintagier. What?  That's a word.

I wasn't thrilled with the way the inside looked where the two big pieces are joined, so I think next time I will make the bodice pieces 3/4 of an inch longer so I can fold it under and insert the skirt into the lined bodice so there are no ugly edge pieces on the inside.







I will also make it about an inch or so longer, because there was a fair amount of belly and top-of-diaper flashing going on.




I will make it again, though... it's perfect for summer -- cool and casual but way cuter than a onesie!

And I even have a few precious scraps of my fabric left for some teeny project down the line!

And this week I finished a project I have been working on for nearly a year and a half! H's baby blanket. I started it three months before she was born. I hadn't planned on making her one, but after I made one for a little friend, I decided she needed one, too.  Only with a young baby it is not exactly easy to find time to sit around knitting! 

 I used this pattern.  It isn't hard at all (in fact, it would be a good first cabling project), just time-consuming!  I actually took out a couple of cables and made it a small "stroller blanket" size, because otherwise it would never have been finished.  So, she's over a year old and just now getting her baby blanket!

with a pencil for scale ;)
The funny thing is, she was lying on this blanket in the pictures I took when she was a few days old and used on her birth announcement.  But it wasn't close to finished.  The blanket ended on needles right out of the frame! Ah, well, it's finally done now. And the first thing I did after finishing it was wash it to get the dusty smell out.  Better late than never!

Saturday, March 10, 2012

Tutorial: Easy Pieced Toddler Skirt out of Two Fat Quarters


I've spent the last eight months or so re-learning to sew by following others' patterns and tutorials, and I'd been kind of wanting to try my own but didn't think I knew enough to come up with anything new. Well, I'm not going to say this is new -- it's not like I'm reinventing the wheel; there are loads of toddler skirt tutorials, even ones using fat quarters -- but I've never seen one exactly like this and it is the first thing I've ever really concocted on my own, sewing-wise, so I'm excited to share it.


The inspiration was this adorable skirt I bought H (on sale, of course). I love the crazy fullness. (I think the style is called dirndl, but I could be wrong.) It looks so cute on her, especially the way it sort of poofs out over her little bottom! The more I looked at it, the more I thought, I could do that! But I wanted to try with vertical instead of horizontal piecing.

For some reason, I got the notion to see if I could make it out of these two coordinating fat quarters I bought ages ago. If you aren't familiar, a fat quarter is a quarter-yard of fabric, but cut "fat" instead of long. I think it started out as a quilting thing, although there are lots of projects you can find using fat quarters. They're usually 18"x22". You can get them precut at Joann's for about $2.50, but I bought these on sale, so paid about half that. The Joann's precuts aren't quite highest quality, though. You can get the good stuff like designer quilting cotton and Japanese imports for about the same price (plus a usually quite small shipping fee) on Etsy. Designer-style, one-of-a-kind skirt for $5 and a bit more than an hour of your time? What's not to like?

I made this to fit a smallish 13-month-old, but it's easily adjustable to fit a smaller baby or quite-a-bit-larger child. You just need to know your child's waist measurement and how long you want it to be. I'll also show you how to add a ribbon belt, if you like. Okay, here's how you do it:


1. Prewash and iron your coordinating fat quarters. You may also want to square them up. I probably should have, as mine were obviously cut from the bolt quite wonky, but I didn't. The fullness of the skirt covers a multitude of sins.

Here's how you cut it.




2. Take Fabric A and neatly fold it in half lengthwise, then again widthwise. Press, creasing sharply, then unfold and cut along the creases. (All these cuts work whether your fabric is directional, napped, or neither--yay!)

3. Fold Fabric B in half lengthwise and press and cut in half. Set one half aside for just a moment. Take the other half and fold, press, and cut it in half again lengthwise, giving you two 22"x4.5" strips. These will eventually become your waistband. Set them aside for now. Go back to the other half of your Fabric B fat quarter. Fold it in half widthwise, then fold it in half widthwise again. Press and cut along the creases; this will give you four 5.5"x9 pieces.

3. You're going to make one long strip of fabric -- the main part of your skirt-- by alternating your Fabric A and Fabric B pieces. This is the most tedious part of the skirt, but even so, it only took me about 20 minutes, and I was doing French seams and ironing between each step. You can join these pieces a variety of ways, including serging if you're lucky enough to have a serger, or regular stitching (followed by pinking or zigzagging the edges. You don't want to leave them raw in this project). I'll show you French seams, because that's what I did. If you want to give your skirt even more fullness, you can use one of the other methods and a narrow seam allowance.

 4. Put two of your pieces together with WRONG sides together. If you haven't done French seams before, this will look and feel really backward to you. Stitch with 1/4 inch seam allowance. I just use the side of my presser foot as my guide. Flip the fabric over and press your seam over the other way neatly. Now with right sides together, stitch, leaving 1/2" allowance. Now your raw edge is enclosed.


5. Repeat this process, alternating between Fabric A and Fabric B, until you have a long strip with eight individual pieces. (The first step of the French seam will look REALLY wrong when it's joined to a piece with the seam already finished, by the way.)
  
Case in point.

  
6. Do one last French seam to join the ends of the strip, making a loop.

7. Sew a basting stitch 1/4 or 1/3 inch from the top and gather. If you don't know how to do this, google "basting stitch gather," and you'll find lots of tutorials. It's super easy. Don't gather it as much as I did, or you'll have to loosen it up a lot. It should be about 1.5 times the waist measurement.

8. Set your main skirt piece aside for now.  Join your two waistband pieces into one long strip. Again, I used a French seam. Then cut this to about 1.5 times the wearer's waist measurement. The scrap you cut away is the only bit of fabric you won't use of your fat quarters (and there is actually a way you can use that up as well -- to come).



9. Fold the waistband strip in half lengthwise and press a crease into it. Then turn one long edge under 1/2 inch and press. I use this awesome folding guide I got as a free download at the Scientific Seamstress blog. Turn the other edge under 3/4 inch and press. You've just made what sort of resembles a double-fold bias tape, except that it isn't cut on the bias. Fold each short end under 1/2 inch and crease.




10. Now we're going to cut four belt loops. I used metallic gold ribbon for a little bling, but you could also use that little fabric scrap you cut off to make four skinny tubes. Cut them about the same length as the waistband is wide (4.5") and pin three of them at even intervals on the right side of your waistband strip, as shown. The fourth will cover the waistband ends, so space them accordingly. Stitch them down at each end.


11. Grab your main skirt piece again. At one of your seams (any one, since there's no front or back at this point), start attaching your waistband like this: With your skirt wrong side out, put your waistband wrong side out with the narrower folded edge positioned at or just ever so slightly below the gathered edge of the skirt. This is hard to explain, so see the photo! Pin.












 11. Adjust your gather so it is the length  of your waistband (with ends folded under) minus half an inch. Pin your waistband to your skirt all the way around, keeping the gather as even as you can. The two folded ends of your waistband strip should overlap. I really tried to show this in the picture, but it's very hard to tell with the fabric I used.
  
12. Stitch all the way around your skirt, as close to the uppermost casing fold as you can.
Here's what you've got after stitching your waistband "tape" on.


13. Turn skirt right-side out and bring your waistband "tape" over so that it encloses the raw top of your skirt and makes a casing for your elastic.  Just like with bias tape, the other fold you made in the waistband should be folded under so there are no raw edges exposed. When you stitch in a moment, you will be closing the waistband and enclosing the gathered edge of your skirt.


At the point where the two ends of your casing meet, slip the end of your fourth belt loop under the casing (just on the outside of the skirt -- the other side will remain loose for now). 

 
Topstitch down as close to the edge of the casing as you can.



14. Cut a piece of 1" elastic 1" longer than the waist measurement you are using. My daughter has a 19" waist, so I cut 20". Using a large safety pin, feed it through your waistband.


When it's all the way through, overlap the elastic 1" and sew to secure.



15. Now sew a seam perpendicular to the casing seam you just sewed (vertical as the skirt is worn) right across the folded-over ends of your casing, which will close your casing and secure your elastic.




16. Fold the bottom edge of your skirt under 1/2 inch and press.



17. Determine how long you want your skirt; fold over as much as desired, press, and hem. I folded it under another half-inch. I hemmed twice, just because I like the way it looks.


If your child is taller, you can save yourself  an inch here by using bias tape instead of hemming.

Here's the inside now.  Look at all those seams!  Aren't you glad you enclosed them all so they're not an unsightly mess?



18. With a needle and thread, sew your last belt loop in place. It is hard to take a picture of yourself sewing with a needle and thread unless you have a third arm, so this looks ridiculous.




19. The part of the skirt with the wider space between the belt loops is the front. Your bow goes here! Cut a nice, wide piece of ribbon to your desired length for your belt. String it and use fray-check or heat sealing to finish the edges. A matching fabric sash would be even cuter if you have one more fat quarter!

 20. Do a Snoopy dance! You did it!




It looks pretty darn cute on my little one, if I say so myself. Cuter in person. I had a very tough time getting a picture of it on because she was in a whirling dervish mood today. I'll update this if I ever get a better shot of it. Imagine how much cuter it would be with some fantastic Amy Butler or Michael Miller fabric!  I'll have to give it a try sometime.



This is my first tutorial, so I hope it makes sense! If I've left anything out, please let me know!